Frequently asked questions

  1. What is the pattern of a normal working day in the life of the King?
  2. What is the role of the Aides de Camp and the Equerries?
  1. What is the pattern of a normal working day in the life of the King?

    The King's activities are very diverse, ranging from audiences at the Palace to state visits abroad.
    The King's working day normally starts at 9 a.m. By then, he has already looked at a number of files and preparatory documents, as well as the newspapers. The King comes from the Belvédère, his residence, to the Palace of Brussels, or he sets off for a destination in the provinces. His official office is at the Palace of Brussels. He consults his staff there, receives the Prime Minister, politicians, representatives of the business, social and cultural world, Heads of State as well as the credentials of Ambassadors. He grants collective audiences to deserving groups and signs many laws and royal decrees. Usually, the King does not leave the Palace before 1.30 p.m. After a brief lunch with the Queen at the Belvédère, he prepares his work for the next day based on information, notes and files and if time allows, relaxes through reading, walking, contacts with his family and friends, or goes for a ride by car or motor-bike.

    The King's undertakes many engagements in the country, whether or not accompanied by the Queen, and these give him the opportunity for direct contacts with the people. Visits to local authorities and businesses, preferably not too formal, are a regular feature on his schedule. His attendance is often sought at ceremonies, but he needs to be selective in view of the large number of invitations.

  2. What is the role of the Aides de Camp and the Equerries?

    The King's Aides de Camp are senior officers or generals (currently there are ten), chosen by the King and charged, in parallel with their duties in the Armed Forces, with carrying out certain tasks on behalf of the Sovereign, such as missions to represent him at events or ceremonies where the King is unable to attend, but where he wishes to show his interest.

    The King's Equerries are young officers chosen by the King and who, in addition to their function within the Armed Forces, take turns at working full-time for a whole week for the Sovereign. In principle, there are six officers who take it in turns to perform this role. The King's Equerry is a trusted person who is at the service of the Sovereign 24 hours a day. He prepares the activities of the King, informs him about all the aspects that may be important to him and tries, as far as possible to facilitate his task but providing various services. In principle, it is the Equerry who receives the King's visitors and guests and announces them. The Equerry accompanies the King during his trips, both within the country and abroad, except for certain activities of a strictly private nature. In the latter case, he is on duty around the clock at the Château du Belvédère, so that the King can always be contacted via him.

    The duty roster of the King's Aides de Camp and that of his Equerries is drawn up by the King's Military Household.